Friday, November 2, 2012

Day 5 - Scootpad


logo

For K-5 teachers looking to offer students a fun, interactive way of completing Common Core objectives, or for middle-level teachers who would like to provide students remedial work in reading and math, Scootpad.com is the place to go.

Scootpad markets itself as "the ultimate way to master math and reading skills. Self-paced and personalized practice keeps kids engaged & challenged."

Once you open Scootpad.com, you have the option to sign in as a teacher or parent. From the location known as the "Dashboard," you create classes into which you can invite students or, if they are too young to follow through with an invitation, you can load them in yourself. The website provides students with a username and password; they log in, set their grade level, and get started.

From your screen as the teacher, you can click on "Classes" and set up groups. They will look like this: 

When you load classes into the program, you can then invite students or set them up individually and provide them their username and password. When you click on an individual class, this is the page you will see:


The class dashboard allows you to follow student interactions, where classmates can welcome one another to the program and cheer each other on in the race to earn coins. Coins are earned by completing practices and homework assignments correctly. 

To add homework assignments, click on the "Homework" tab on the left. The screen that pops up allows you to name the assignment, provide a start and end date, set the task (Math, Reading, Spelling, etc.) and add students.






When you click "Add students" this is the screen you will see:



You can select individual students or all students. Then, Scootpad offers you the ability to track their progress and results. You can either click on "Homework" on the left and select the magnifying glass next to the assignment you want to see, or you can click on "Results" on the bottom left:


Once here, you can click the small magnifying glass to view results at a more specific level.


You can also view the progress of an entire class by selecting "Progress by Concept" or "Progress by Unit" on the "Results" page.


On the bottom of the above page, it offers you the option of generating improvement practice!

Students are also able to review incorrect answers and continue practicing at their own rate:



The coins students collect can be used to redeem prizes, on which you decide and load into the system. It then tells you when a student has redeemed a reward.



Scootpad also has apps on the iPad, Android, and Kindle. The Scootpad app is available, as well as their ConceptBANK app. With the demand for tracking progress and differentiating work for students, this online program is a big help!

Your Challenge: 

If you have used the tool, explain how. In what specific ways do you see Scootpad's able to be used in your classroom?  What creative functions can you think of past general remediation on Scootpad? Please comment with your thoughts/ideas!

35 comments:

  1. In a science classroom, one of the greatest challenges is assuring that students are all operating from the same baseline mathematically. Since math is used so heavily in science, a student who doens't have the basic algebra and geometry skills will be left behind without the teacher ever knowing the reason. This website represents a fun and game-based method to assure students will have the skills they need for physics or physical science, and allow the teacher to track progress as well. It may be advertised for elementary or middle schools, but I think it could work at the high school level, as well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. In high school English inclusion and remediation classes, Scootpad could be used to differentiate or supplement instruction to help students gain basic reading and language skills they are missing. Like students in science classes, students in English classes also need a set of baseline skills.

    ReplyDelete
  3. With the implementation of BURST and Earobics, there comes the challenge of what to do with the rest of the class, while the teacher is running intervention groups. This looks like something different and differentiated for our students to do. I think the teachers in my building would love this! I will need to see if it works on iPods as well as iPads.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kati,
      Yes it does work on Ipads and I assume Ipods. Our teachers have been using and LOVE it. The students really enjoy it too.

      Delete
  4. Looking at the standards it covers for math, I could use this as a remediation tool in my algebra classes. It covers operations with fractions (at a 5th grade level), but the concepts are the same ones my current high schoolers struggle with. I think I will save this site for next semester when I get the algebra students who will repeat the first semester of the course. This could be a good way to improve their basic computational skills and hopefully improve their math self-esteem!

    ReplyDelete
  5. What I like about this tool is its game-based incentives. We know that immediate feedback helps learners to grow, and since it is an environment in which it is "safe to fail" students are more likely to take risks in their learning as they strive to master the content. I also like that there is a social element to this tool. Teaching students to interact positively via social media is just as important as it is in physical environments. The sooner we begin talking with students about interacting online and giving them a place to practice those skills, the more effective we will be at shaping them into good digital citizens.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I know it's advertised as elementary but I could so use this today in my high school math classes as many others have stated. Just the game incentives would be reason enough; the kids are so competitive that it would work. At first I thought it was like 19 pencils from the teacher side but with the reward systems and game like atmosphere it could be as competitive as gaming. The fractions would really trip them up but maybe they would see it as a fun way to do fractions. So many of my students just don't do fractions. Even easy stuff like half! Another tool for my 2.0 tool belt. Again, TIME!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Signed up my classes but can't figure out how to assign the work yet. Watched the video... will have to keep at it because although the grade level is lower than what I teach I have children who could benefit from this tool. I hope I can figure it out by next week. I love to start the week integrating a new site for my students.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jane,

      To assign the work, you go to Homework, create the assignment you want to do, and then select "Add students." The homework is in the Task selection menu; for each "practice" you assign, students do ten questions. Hope this helps!

      Karla

      Delete
  8. Students are always needed a review of some standard before they become proficient. This seems to be a great way to reinforce some of those standards. Plus, students love to play a "game" as a method of review. Looks like it might be a great piece to add to our toolbox!

    ReplyDelete
  9. This would be a great opportunity to differentiate instruction for students. Since that term gets tossed about, this tool would actually do that for students!!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I teach a basic skills development class, which often feels like study hall. However, as I have helped a few students with their work, I've seen that a lot still struggle with things like fractions and adding/subtracting negative numbers. I could use this for students who don't have anything to do (which having something to work on in every class is part of their daily grade) to get extra practice in math and reading because a lot of them do need it. I definitely agree with the others who have said that it would still work for high school. They love playing games and are very competitive.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This would be great to use with students in my resource class. They frequently comes with no work to do and this would give me an easy way to assign them practice work based on their individual needs. I also think they will enjoy the game aspect of it.

    ReplyDelete
  12. As a high school math teacher, I encounter MANY students who cannot manipulate fractions even as they matriculate to the higher level courses. I could see this being used as enrichment as well as remediation in the lower grades, remediation on the upper grade levels just to reinforce the basics that have been missed. Since it is self-paced, special education students would benefit too. It looks engaging enough to keep a student's interest and I think they would want to work on this on their own without much prompting.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I was so excited to see Scootpad! One of our first grade teachers introduced me to this. I have downloaded a shortcut on our computer lab computers. The students can't wait to get on. They do not even realize they are learning, practicing, and studying because of the game aspect to it. I like that it gives them another chance and then in the end lets them know what they missed and if they need to practice that section again. I like it from a teacher's perspective because it sends me an email to let me know who is on the top of the leaderboard. I make announcements and it encourages students to work harder. The students also enjoy the class wall to talk with each other. It is an easy way to introduce them to the aspect of blogging. I also like that you can easily assign homework for the students to practice. I just wish that all my students had netbooks or a one to one so more students could take advantage. We currently use when we have computer lab and I have the same few who are always on. It also keeps them progressing to higher levels or you can set the level for those students who need a lower level to practice. This allows them to feel just as much success as the other students.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I really like this app. It seems professionally built, with good standards integration. I would love to see something like this for music, and the sad fact is that many programs with standards integration (MBC, Planbookedu.com for a couple) do not have our fine arts standards built in or included. Some really good points were brought up above about what to do with the rest of the class while you are holding intervention groups. This or something like it seems like a good solution. As a parent, I really like this kind of app for my children to practice at home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The program also allows students to invite their parents--it helps them earn even more coins to include a parent email to their profile!

      Delete
  15. Love Scootpad! This is a perfect one for me! I actually just signed up and started a class last week, as I saw this on another Ed blog. However, I haven't had a chance to use it yet. I envision using it for practice as I'm working with small groups in a math workshop model. My students are highly driven by competition. They will love the ability to earn coins in a game format. Also, I love that students are able tor review items they missed and have extra practice. In Acuity, students aren't able to see items they missed. The homework feature is also something I'd love to add to as a homework option for the week. The large majority of my families have internet access. For those that do, they could use this as one homework option. Just as Melissa said, I'd love to have a one-to-one situation in my classroom, but we at least have a computer lab and some netbook carts.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I could use this game with my "Math in the Kitchen" lessons, the fact that it is a computer "game" would make middle school students interested. I also think it would be good to have this set up for my sixth grade homeroom students who are often telling me they do not have work during enrichment!

    ReplyDelete
  17. It does not have any application in the music classroom, but I can see how it can be engaging to students for review. Nice Weebly, Karla, your students must really enjoy your class! Thank you for the screen shots as well, very detailed explanation.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I'm excited about using this program with my students. While I am working with a few students, I can have them work on this program on their own.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I can't seem to access the resources? Does it come with the materials or do I need to link or upload my own?

    ReplyDelete
  20. I love the idea of this, but will have to play around with the content before I know if this particular program fits my classes. This seems like a great resource for elementary school and a great activity for middle school students who need other things to do either because they finish work quickly or because they struggle. The game aspect of it will keep their interest and attention.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I really like the feel it gives or the ease of use it has. This would help student feel more comfortable using it. Game based instruction is a hot topic and this looks like a great fit for the lower levels or remediation for the upper grades.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I haven't used Scootpad, but I think this would be a great tool for our teachers here to help in remediation since many of the students struggle due to lack of support at home. I think that even our intervention teachers/ students would love something like this!

    ReplyDelete
  23. I do like scootpad. I currently use Manga High and it definitely has limitation to it that scoot pad does not. That combined with the more clearly defined standards and possible assignment of remediation for those having difficulty with the topic is a big plus. I also like the fact that you can assign your students their passwords and logins as well. This is always important when you consider doing multiple sites for the students in just your own classroom. I try and keep their login and passwords as close to Acuity as it will let me. This reinforces the login and passwords needed for other classrooms as well as my own.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I played around a little bit with Scootpad and it is geared towards K-5 standards. I teach 6th and 7th grade students. This would be most beneficial in my 6th grade class because they do not currently have a program to help with reading remediation for 6th grade at my school. The 7th and 8th grade have Achieve3000 to help with reading remediation.
    I could use this in conjunction with Acuity for my 6th graders to improve their reading skills with some of the 5th grade standards that they did not pass or are currently struggling with. It could also be used a review tool before building upon grammatical skills for my 6th grade students.

    ReplyDelete
  25. This looks amazing for K-5, the graphics are good for that age group, for my high schoolers, not so much.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Awesome platform for differentiated instruction! This could be a really helpful tool to help some of our teachers shore up their Tier One instruction in different subject areas. I definitely agree that it could be used through high school. Older students enjoy the gaming platform and motivation.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Sometimes I wish I was an elementary teacher. Srsly.

    This is an adorable site with great graphics and amazing potential for modified or differentiated instruction. In high school, we're currently using Achieve3000, which I imagine is a similar concept to Scootpad, though definitely not near as cute. Sometimes finding the time to differentiate is difficult but the ease of using programs like these provides teachers with the resources to be able to provide meaningful, individualized instruction to their kiddos.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I love this!! I had not heard of this before now, and can't wait to jump in! My 4th graders will love the game-like feel of this. Currently, we use "Study Island," and they enjoy that, but this tool makes learning much more personal. I love the fact that there is the social piece, in which students can welcome others, etc.
    I will use this as part of my Interventions period, so the assignments can be different for each student. I will be sharing this with my colleagues as well! Love it!

    ReplyDelete
  29. This seems like a great tool to get kids to practice for Math and Reading. I especially like the game aspect and the ability to earn coins. The prizes for the coins can be changed often or made specific to motivate certain students. I think I would use this when working with a student having academic difficulty that has led to behavior problems. I could follow their progress indiviudally and reward them for doing well. It may be a lower level than what some of the students are working at but going over needed skills can only improve the students academics and it can be fun too.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Nice idea for using gaming in class. I promise to pass it along to an elementary teaching friend. With that said, I think it could be useful to middle and high school students who are struggling.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I just had to comment again on this program. I have tried it out and I am in Love with it. My kids are going crazy about it. We are having a blast using it. Thanks for the introduction into the program!!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Not something I would personally use in a high school English class, but I will pass it along to my remedial math teacher friend!

    ReplyDelete