Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Day 22 - Ujam



I am honored to be able to blog as part of the 30 Day Challenge. Ujam is a phenomenal tool that is easy to use. The Ujam.com website allows teachers or students to make their own music and not have to worry about copyright issues. You could use the music you make to put in a presentation or to just have fun and create "study-songs". I will show you how.

1) Once you create a profile, you will see a button that says "Go Jam". Click the button.
2) When the "Go Jam" button is pressed this is what your screen will look like.
If you want vocals, click "record vocals or instrument". To upload a file from your computer click, "upload audio file". To do just instruments click "rejam song template".
3) Once you have clicked your choice and have started making your song or adding instruments, you can change the chords used for that certain tune. To learn more about how Ujam works, you can watch the video.

Your Assignment: In what ways can see yourself or your students using Ujam?

30 comments:

  1. I had a project recently where students were asked to modify a song and somehow make it your own, either through different graphics on a YouTube video or by singing it themselves. I was disappointed when no one chose the latter. I think if I had known about Ujam and shared it with my students, some of them would have chosen this option. Ujam has so many features where the end product doesn't even have to sound like you! Students who disregarded the singing option because they were embarrassed of their voice, now have a new option.

    I could see using this myself to create examples for the students. I cannot sing at all, but using all the modifiers on Ujam, I think I might be able to make a good track to show the students that they can do it as well.

    Now, I just have to write a song!

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  2. Fun tool with tons of applications in my music classroom. I am currently using Audacity and Aviary to have my students submit recordings of their voices to me. Some things that I noticed when I was playing with Ujam this morning:

    - I like that there is a metronome to use for recording your voice. Keeps them on tempo and makes for easier remixing later.

    - Being able to convert voice recordings into an instrument means that my general music students would be more likely to use it. They aren't fond of having to have their own voices in their creations!

    - I love that they can select the chords that accompany their singing. This would be a great way to have students create variations on familiar songs by playing with the harmonies.

    - The song templates would be good for teaching improvisation.

    - Using this would make listening to 95 recorded tests every grading period WAY more interesting :)

    Looking forward to spending more time exploring this!

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  3. This is cool...there aren't many audio-editing websites available on the web and Audacity is pretty much only good for recording and not much effects-styling.

    It was loading a little slow for me, so it could be a bandwidth thing for the network, but it made it a little frustrating to use.

    I think it would be fun to see some kids begin narrating their own work and then using Ujam to put a soundtrack behind it. It would be a pretty involved instructional loop (using Jing, recording their voice with Audacity and then editing with UJam) but I think it would drive kids to be a little more creative with their work. Auto-tuning is also a lot of fun, and it makes things that are pretty menial into some instant classics. Maybe I should start auto-tuning my podcasts to spice them up a little bit.

    Kids could even take a Voki, record a comment, take the audio into UJam and remix that.

    I like the fact that it has so many applications with other tools we've highlighted.

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  4. My daughter just had to do an assignment for her 8th grade health class that had them take the lyrics to a popular song they liked and then change them to talk about protecting various key body parts, hers was the brain. We jsut found the Don't Stop Believing instrumental and put it to a Photostory. This would have been neat to have her actually sing along, she could have in photostory as well, but this seems more interesting for the kids. I am constantly looking on youtube for songs that someone has created to go along with a concept. My kids favorite so far was the song about the earth's layers. They still ask me to play it. It would be neat to have kids make their own songs to help remember key concepts or as an assessment tool to see if they got a concept. I like the spelling list song to help them remember, I will have to use this for my youngest.

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  5. This site ROCKS!!! Literally, it rocks.

    Last year, I had this idea but couldn't make it work. But now I do.

    My students are going to take audio clips of The Crucible and create songs out of it. I love the autotune effects option. They can read it or take parts of the audiobook and use them. The assignment will be to pick the most important and most relevant sections and make a song out of it that will give the highlights of the play.

    I am super excited about this one!!!!

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  6. I use several songs in class that are prevocaled, preinstrumentalized, and prerecorded. I like using them because they do teach the vocabulary we are working with that the time.
    Last year as an extra credit assignment my first year students created their own music video about verbs. This would have come in super handy then! I'm going to use this next week as an alternative assignment to the weekly Quizlet assignment. Instead of making flashcards to study, why not make a song for them! I could also ask students to make songs to teach verb conjugations, tenses, classroom phrases, and lots of other terms we use. Maybe I could even use it help reinforce geography in some way. Music is a bit part of life, why not make learning more fun with it?

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  7. My students have been begging for the opportunity to create math songs since I first showed them the Ron Clark Academy's Order of Operations song and Numbers Up. Here is a tool that they can use to make their recordings. I have a talented group of students who could showcase their knowledge in a different manner. I would create a "menu" for them to choose between recording a song, making a video, making an ActivInspire lesson, or just creating a class activity. This would work great for our upcoming lessons on operations with integers. I feel like having that choice to use this tool would really engage and inspire them. On a side note, I think my students would love to use this just for fun! I may show it to them as part of a short tech lesson!

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  8. I had trouble coming up with an application for this tool in the math classroom besides using it to create original math raps. I even put a few students to work, playing with the site to get some ideas from them. They enjoyed playing with the buttons and sound tracks and I just keep coming back to the idea that music, for many of my students, is such a motivator. They can remember lyrics to many songs and have dance moves perfected. This tool is a way to harness that creative musical influence by setting content to a sound track. Our last vocabulary quiz was not great with this same class...I would like to challenge them to create a musical definition or rap for the next set of words.

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  9. I echo what Mrs. Esparza said. It is hard to come up with an application for math class. One thing I thought I could do would be to have my lower grade students come up with some multiplication raps to help them with their times tables. Another thought is that almost every week my students have ten vocabulary words to write down and remember for a quiz on Friday. I have been letting them make flip charts, but it might be fun to let them make their own song or rap to present to the class instead.

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  10. Great tool, most audio programs like this cost a pretty penny. This is probably the the best free program I have seen. I would use this to have my students make their radio commercials in my general music class. I used to use tape recorders and have recently moved up to digital recording, but this will be a lot easier and more interactive for the students.

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  11. I have some very creative students this year and after watching the School House Rock videos try were begging to recreate the songs. We used some of the tools on their netboos to rewrite songs like "Lolly Lolly Adverbs." However, the we had to do a lot.of research to figure out the tools. We could easily record the songs using this tool and evn add in a nice beat. Love it!

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  13. I recently visited the Ron Clark Academy and among the many things I learned and took away from there was their propensity to use songs to learn. From the time we got there to the time we left, students were singing. And they were not just singing top 40 hits off the radio; they were singing custom songs, often using the rhythm and melody of a popular song but the words were replaced by the students to become a learning tool. They had songs for math and the order of operation, a song for chemistry for the periodic table, and a song in literature to remember the rhythm of prose.

    Ujam would allow students to take their songs a step further and actually create a digitized version of them. Students that are shy or that do not want to record their own voices can use the feature that allows them to convert their voice into instruments. I know my upper elementary students would really enjoy this. I'm thinking we could create a "Digital Citizenship Rap!"

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  14. This tool could be used with beginning readers as a way to help with oral reading fluency. Students could practice matching their pace and rhythym of oral reading selections with those pre recorded by the teacher. It seems that it could be motivating for reluctant readers by having students practice a reading passage until they could read it fluently without errors and with good expression. With teacher help the student recording could be enhanced via all the style, instrument, tempo, pitch, etc. selections available via UJam. This is another tool that a teacher would want to try out and experiment with to come up with even more ideas about how to use it. I do think that adding music to instruction is very motivating and could engage students who are hard to engage in more traditional instruction.

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  15. This makes me wish I was a student again! There is so much brain reasearch that speaks to the use of music in learning new concepts. Making a song or rap would definitely be a higher level skill and make some of our concepts and standards come alive for our students. This tool makes it easy for students to creat songs w/o the need for a great voice! I could see using this for math "rules," songs based on characters or stories, and presentations on historical figures. What a fun and engaging tool for kids to show what they know!

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  16. This is a tool that I experimented with last year and absolutely loved the idea of using it. I discovered it near the end of the year and never got to put it to good use. After taking too much time to experiment with this one on my own, I think I could see teachers using this tool to create musical 'content' for their classes. For those of us who weren't born real 'hip' I sounded pretty amazing to my students as I showed them what I made. Not only could teachers create but students would definitely benefit from taking a concept or idea and representing it musically potentially for 'performance' in class. I started a podcast last year that is available in the iTunes store. Imagine posting student work that could be available for free in the iTunes store!!

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  17. We know that music is a great tool for some students to learn. This tool can be used to help students turn material into song. As a coach I see me showing teachers this tool and help them to incorporate into their lessons plans or an a choice assignment for student projects.

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  18. I was talking to some pre-service teachers last week on the use of hip hop in the classroom. that conversation was more about examining lyrics as a way to talk about social justice issues, but Ujam also makes it possible for students to use the music patterns of their culture, or more importantly, to incorporate their interests and music genres of choice to talk about some of those same issues, or as an alternate way to show what they have learned about a topic. Lots of room for a student's learning style and natural creativity to shine through while still getting content and applying what they have learned. Gives new definition to student voice!

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  19. I am always making up silly tunes or songs to help students remember things. This would just be fun to have music with it too! Now, instead of my own tunes, my students can get in the fun and make some of their own! They can be recorded and saved for use for next year! Love this! Previously I just had students find a song they knew and change the words, but this is much better.

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  20. I love using 'The Mole Song' and 'Mendeleev' to introduce a topic - and my students love it too. I could use those as examples, or better yet, create my own, and have the students make up their own silly 'study' song or a song that would introduce the topic to a future class.

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  21. What a great way to avoid copyright issues when looking for background music for projects!

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  22. When I teach using the quadratic equation to solve quadratics, I sing a little song to my classes. I will definitely have to do this and use the ujam. I will then challenge my students to create their own song about solving quadratics. A good suggestion was given in that this could be a group project and involve the video production class. Videos could be created using the green screen with students lip syncing and appropriate graphics. Pretty neat tool!

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  23. I commented on this one before the guest! So, I am re-posting, so I'll have credit on the chart for day 22. I really loved this program. I'm a music teacher, so naturally, I'm always looking for music tools in the classroom, and also involving technology, I'm loving ujam! I've made some songs with my classes with them speaking/singing, and then let them choose the style and listen to different styles to talk about the kinds of music and the differences in them. Great tools for pitch modulation and speed, and I like the ease of adapting to itunes and saving on the spot. Thanks!

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  24. Ujam might be a fun way to work with poetry next grading period. Students will be looking at a variety of ways to interpret poetry. Sharing their ideas through song can make this a more engaging learning experience.
    For those of us who can't carry a tune, this is the perfect tool. I can drown out my voice!

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  25. Again, it would be neat to use as an option for students to get to know each other. A good portion of my students are in band and just love music period. I think this would appeal to them especially if they have this option for a presentation.

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  26. Wow! My mouth fell to the floor during the video. I cannot believe what you can get for free! I make up funny songs to remember math formulas and remember vocabulary. I will use this to create a beat that goes along with my horrible voice. As for my students, they like to come up with rhymes and songs to help themselves remember. We can all ujam together!

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  27. Very cool...there are a lot of fun songs on youtube to help learn material. This could be fun to let the students create their own. I could challenge my anatomy class to create a better "bone dance" than what Hannah Montana did.
    On another note... Michelle Roach has a great video on youtube doing one of her songs. :)

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  28. I feel like I'm repeating what the other math teachers have already stated. The kiddos in my room also love the Order of Operations Rap. They really love the old Multiplication Rock videos. I'm thinking that they could make updated versions of these. Especially since some of them are a bit dated or "old old school" in their words.

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  29. Honestly, I thought I would just comment on this and move on, never using it as I have no musical talent whatsoever. I decided to watch the intro video anyways and was amazed at what you could do. I keep thinking of the Ron Clark songs that he uses to teach concepts based on hit songs but I have tried to do this before and found it quite difficult. With these features, as a class we could simply write the lyrics and the song would create itself. I can se using this for vocabulary, math concepts and methods, and parts of speech explanations much like the School House Rocks, but without having to "rip them off."

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  30. Music can be a great tool in working with students. Many times they use it as a release or a get away so to speak. I have in the past has students pick songs that make them feel better when they are angry or sad and then record them on a CD. This would work so much better especially if they can create there own music to share with others.

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