Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Day 16 - Little Bird Tales



Your Assignment: Go through the Prezi above to learn about today's tool. Little Bird Tales is just one of many digital storytelling tools. Consider the different skills you are teaching within your content.  How could you integrate a resource like Little Bird Tales?

Additional resources for setting up a FREE teacher account are included in the following PDF.  

35 comments:

  1. AH! I wish I would have known about this a few weeks ago. My chemistry students just turned in homemade books about elements. Their project was to make a book for elementary age students about one element from the periodic table. It needed to have a cover page, table of contents, five pages of information, and a glossary. Little Bird Tales would have been a great resource for those students who would rather do the book online than on paper. I had several students who turned in all typed books, because they weren't inclined to draw it on paper. Next year, I will definitely add the option for my students to create a children's book using Little Bird Tales.

    In addition to the classroom, I can see many personal uses for this website. A Little Bird Tale would definitely make any grandparent happy!

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  2. My school has a young author's night every year. I can see this being added to the format, and allow students to present them for their parents, teachers, and classes. Definitely a program worthwhile for the elementary age to use, or any age to be creative. I will have my computer club try making some and we will share them later!

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  3. For the past year or so I've been using StoryJumper in my technology class. The kids like it and it is a good way to get kids excited about writing and becoming authors of their own books. Little Bird Tales appears to be very similar to StoryJumper. However, I like the added feature of being able to record your voice and narrate the story. I know my students would love this feature. I'll probably try this out second semester in place of StoryJumper and get students feedback to compare the two sites.

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  4. I couldn't get the Prezi to come up so I tried out the site on my own. I teach 3rd grade math, science and social studies and we do a lot of projects where we take a math concept and turn it into a story-working in e/la skills. In the past we've just made a flip chart story. This would be perfect alternative for this project! I really liked how kid friendly the site was and how there were not ads or pop-ups that came up. :)

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  5. I think it would be really cute to have my choir students make up story songs (along the same lines as "The Wheels on the Bus" or "Old MacDonald") to share with elementary music students at our feeder schools. They could write the songs, find or create images to illustrate, and record themselves singing. I struggle with finding meaningful activities for the rest of the class to do when I am running sectionals - this could be a really nice ongoing project they could work on throughout the year during that time.

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  6. The above comment is from me. I posted from my other account, oops!

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  7. My first impression is that this is a crossover of Jing and Photostory. Photostory in the sense that the learners are creating the images for the story and Jing with the voice recording, etc.

    I could see this being used by kids that don't want to do live screen recordings with Jing. They could import screenshots of what they're teaching and then narrate over top with the captions on the bottom. I'm also starting a chemistry project where they choose an object and explain visually how large it becomes in chemical terms (Google "chemistry mol" and you'll see...it's big). They could create visuals and then narrate the story.

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  8. I might be able to use this in my general music class, the students could do a project on their favorite artist/band and present them to the class.

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  9. I think this is a great tool that could be easily applied to any grade and subject. I recently had my 5th grade students come up with multiplication rhymes for facts they had a hard time recalling. It would have been cute to have them illustrate them and put them all together as a book to share out. One of my favorites was "Six and eight get along great! Six times eight is 48!" Having an illustration to go with it, would have been fun!

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  10. I think this is another tool that teachers can use with their students. I work with new teachers and plan on showing them this as a way for students to get to know them and as a tool for them to use in their classrooms. I am watching the comments posted so I have ideas for them to use.

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  11. I've done something similar by making a photostory and recording my own voice then uploading to teachertube for a class project. I think that LittleBird has simplified this process for students. We all like something that is user friendly! The less time it takes the students to figure out, the better quality the project and learning. I never want to hinder a studnet from completeing a project simply because the technology was too hard to use.
    In my 4th year class we study Japanese folk tales. I think that LittleBird or StoryJumper will be the way I go this year for that project. I could also see my students using this as an alternative to a speaking in front of the class. While I know there are many who don't struggle with speaking in front of their peers, some would rather not.
    I might also use this for an upcoming family project in Japanese 1. The students have had to create a family photo album or tree in the past. This will be a simple way for them to delete the paper, glue, scissors, and physical pictures.

    On a side note: oddly enough the story on the front page of StoryJumper is the same folk tale I made a video of.

    Here's a link to my TeacherTube video:http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=65288&title=Momotaro___Peach_Boy___English&ref=stephenssensei

    Also just for kicks the StoryJumper Verison:http://www.storyjumper.com/book/index/201/The-Legend-of-Momotaro

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  12. I can see using this tool for my students as they do problem solving activites. They can make up or do a short storyor problem and then illustrate it. They can read the problem in parts and then put pieces together that will give them the final outcome. It may not be something that can be done often, but is different and a way to have fun learning.

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  13. When I taught first grade, we published student written books by laminating and using a spiral binder, etc... This would be a great way to enhance the process and show off their end product!

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  14. Little Bird Tales seems to be a great fit for an E/LA class. For math, I could see using this site to define vocabulary with images, the text definition, and then the student voice to record what the word means in their own words. Perhaps a step-by-step problem could be broken down into parts along with an image of work shown for each step.

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  15. I like Ms. Michel's comment on using for representing a math concept of showing how they solved the problem. I think I will try this. We do a record version with activeinspire but I think this is more user friendly for the kids and they could add drawing. I have been using the Photostory for reports on Ben Franklin. We also did a file folder report on Ben Franklin and one of his inventions. I had them draw Ben and one of his inventions. I could see this being more fun with added drawing aspect of it and I could have had them make the file folder report on this instead. I like that it is very easy to use and simple enough for the kids to use.

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  16. I've enjoyed reading everyone's ideas so far. I tweeted out today's post and heard back from Little Bird Tales that they are due to release an iPad app early next year. Just thought someone might be excited about that update.

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  17. This tool was posted at a perfect time for me. My students are working on Sharon Draper's "Romiette and Julio" and the novel has a lot of dialect, slang, and text-type words in it. As we dive deeper into the novel I was going to have my students create a text/chat slang dictionary with illustrations and the like. It would be a great way to incorporate the netbooks to have them use Little Bird instead of creating the dictionary on paper. That way we could showcase it a little easier and it would offer for groups to work together, which would allow for more versions of the dictionary. Or instead of making one paper class version, each student could even make their own.

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  18. It looks like it has found it niche with the primary ages, but I can see where it could be utilized at the high school level.

    I would be a bit hesitant to jump onto this as we already have PhotoStory on the netbooks and the kids are already familiar with it. I would hate to spring something else on them, especially if it was a bit below their level.

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  19. I had a project last year where my students needed to create a story telling me about reflection, rotation, or translation. They were very cute, but not everyone could see them. If we would have used this, everyone could have seen the stories and read them to study before a test!

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  20. @John, for students who get frustrated with not having enough space for text with PS3, this offers a great alternative. To me that's the beauty of knowing what's out there. When someone wishes outloud for better functions I can offer other options.

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  21. This could be used to create instructional books for teachers. Most of all, I think it will be a great resource for teachers to use for students who struggle with creative writing. These students can voice their stories with great detail and even draw pictures but have difficulty writing the words. This would allow them to be successful with creating and sharing a story.

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  22. Several of the articles in the edited book "Everyday Anti-Racism: Getting real about race in schools" (Pollack, Ed.) talks about letting students conduct 'action research' type projects in their local communities as a way of developing historical cultural knowledge. It suggests collecting the stories of family members, church elders, neighbors, etc. in order to get a better understanding of local culture, cultural shifts, and uncovering potential mentors (among many other things). I conducted a similar research project in Ohio with a local High School (and we only had disposable cameras and audiocassettes at that time!). This type of tool could be an excellent way to do that type of project, particularly in a school/neighborhood that has a rich history that students may not always know about or appreciate. This type of project would be an excellent way to discuss culture and diversity, and would extend writing skills, communication skills, and would be an excellent multidisciplinary project for several content areas. On top of that, this tool can even extend the project, because (at least in my mind), the next step using this type of tool is to share it with the community, and even talk about social justice and advocacy, in the sense of promoting challenge based learning, in which we are encouraged to "take a stand and make a difference". This tool would could extend out of the classroom and into service learning.

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  23. It would be interesting to have primary grade students create stories with their own drawings and oral reading as an example of their work. These stories could be created at the beginning of a school year and then again near the end of the school year as a way to show progress in skill development.

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  24. Little Bird Tales could be used in the classroom in a couple different ways. First, I can see where it would be a good way to make a connection between the abstract and concrete, taking an idea and showing what it means. It also allows students an alternative way to expressing themselves and their ideas. Instead of a traditional essay or written response, they can show what they have learned in pictures or a multimedia presentation.

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  25. In the past, I have had my students research how different math concepts are used in the real world and then create a google search story from their findings. Their projects were neat. I could see where Little Bird Tales could be used for this project to allow for more creativity. I could also see using this for the massive vocabulary that is used in geometry (possibly proofs, too).

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  26. Oh my goodness. Amazing tool! I teach reading strategies to K-3 and this couldn't be better. What do these ages love to talk about most? Themselves! I could help them write books about topics of their interest, illustrate, and have them read the books to me. How intriguing would this be! I'm really excited about this one!

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  27. This would be fun to have students illustrate ionic and covalent bonding, and to create a tutorial that would explain what they've learned to others in a simple way.

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  28. When I saw this, a couple of ideas came to mind. First, our students take monthly core experience field trips. I think this would be a great tool for the kids to create a digital storybook based on the trip they took, i.e. coal mine, rock quarry, Howell Wetlands, etc. I also thought about a first grade team I worked with last year. We did an entire study of African Animals and incorporated it with a study of nonfiction as a genre. I could see the kids creating a nonfiction book, complete with text features, based on the animals they studied. The narration could help them with the speaking and listening standards we are trying to tackle. Great stuff!

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  29. This seems like a great tool for elementary classrooms where students could create a book. I can think of student projects in the past that I would like to have had a copy of the work my child created or performed in class. Seems like a very straight-forward to get younger students creating with an online tool that would be safe and fun for them.

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  30. I agree with some of the other posts that this tool seem more applicable to the elementary classrooms, but I often have my students create a project that they have to be able to present or teach to elementary students. Students have to really put forth the time to understand the material and figure out how to break it down for a lower level student to understand it. Students really seem to enjoy this type of project. I might try this with my environmental unit in my biology classes this spring.

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  31. Little Bird Tales can be used in my classes as a tool for narrative writings. Language arts students are expected to present narratives. It is extremely time consuming for students to give individual presentations. With this tool, they can present to each other in small groups and I can view all of the projects later for grading.
    This is exciting. The kids are going to love it. My only concern is that they will think it is childish, so I will have to show them examples prior to setting them free to create their own.

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  32. This is a nice way to inroduce literacy into the classroom. For biology, I would probably have this as an option for a project in evolution or ecology. Students could tell a story of how an organism changed over time or how humans can affect a species in its environment.

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  33. I think there are a number of good uses for this, although it seemed like a straight forward program to publish a story digitally. I've seen early primary grade teachers display student work with illustrations and attempts at writing that is illegible or unreadable by the viewer, so they write what the student meant to along with it. This would be a tool that could eliminate that and allow the student to tell it
    You could use something like this as a post to a class website for many to view, or use as an open house presentation for parents.
    A third idea I had is for students to scan selected samples from throughout the year and put them together as a "portfolio of their year's work. They could then dictate the book explaining what they learned and why the particular work was chosen. This final idea is something I could have each student complete on iPads or netbooks and look forward to doing later this year.

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  35. I think this would be a very theraputic tool to use with middle or high school students. They could create a book on topic of something that was hard for them when they were in elementary school and how they persevered. It could be bullying, a difficult teacher, bad grades, behavior etc, This book could be created and passed on to elementary students either read by the olders student or presented by the teacher. Both students would benefit from the project.

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