Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Day 12 - Search Creative Commons

Image licensed under Creative Commons by Will Lion

I loved this image depicting Kapor's metaphor for information overload when I first saw it at the start of the one-to-one program in the high schools. Over the last two years, I’ve seen it appear in numerous blogs and presentation; most often without attribution to the creator.  If you’re a researcher, writer or creative person of any kind, you’ll know how time consuming it is to track down permission to use the images, music, etc. you want to include in your work.  So often we opt to skip that step, justifying that we're just using it for school or that others before us have copied and reused it.  Once we find ourselves forming that habit, it is difficult to change our behavior.  Yet, when our students consume images, sounds and other information we believe they need to cite their sources when representing another’s work or idea as their own.  How do we align our beliefs with our habits?  One solution is to create original visual and audio elements, and yet this is not always possible.  In that case, the next time you or your students are searching for a creative work to include in your product, use advanced searches that filter out content by copyright privileges.  While most search engines have advanced settings, Creative Commons offers a search tool that makes this quite convenient. 

Your search for images, videos, or audio clips can be refined by usage rights and by media host using http://search.creativecommons.org/. This tool offers you the choice of ten different media hosts including Europeana (media), Flickr (images), Fotomedia (image), Google (web), Google Images (images), Jamendo (music), Open Clip Art Library (images), SpinXpress (media), Wikimedia Commons (media) and YouTube (video).
 
Step 1 Start a Creative Commons Search
There are two ways to access the Creative Commons Search. First, go directly to http://search.creativecommons.org/ by typing the URL into your web browser.  Your other option is to go to the website creativecommons.org and then click on the “Find CC-licensed works” button under the Explore section.



Step 2 Enter your search term
Enter keywords for your search in the field at the top of the page.


Step 3
Check the appropriate filters for your search

To filter material based on the type of use you want to make, go to the box at the top right hand side of the search query field. This gives you two options “use for commercial purposes” and “modify, adapt or build upon.” You can select one, both or none of the boxes.  Checking both boxes will restrict your finds to those that are under a No Derivative Works license and can be used for commercial use, whereas if you don’t select either of the boxes you will get materials under all of the Creative Common licenses. For most classroom searches you would only need to check the second filter.


At this point it might be useful to sort out some of the jargonIt’s not as complicated as it sounds. Creative Commons licenses divide content into categories, allowing people to use content as long as they agree to the terms. There are four license terms, which are listed below, but you can find these paired together to create a set of options.  For obvious reasons, you will not find a work licensed as No Derivatives and Share-alike. 

Attribution (by) – the original author/creator must be credited.
Non-Commercial (nc) - the work must not be used for commercial purposes.
No Derivatives (nd) – the work must not be modified.
Share-alike (sa) – any derivative works must be licensed under the same Creative Commons license.


Step 4 Choose the right type of material
You can further restrict the type of content you are looking for by selecting the media host. The Creative Commons Search Portal gives you access to ten different search engines and each has its own tab on the main page. Clicking on your choice will pull up the search terms you entered in step 2.  By selecting Google, you can search multiple types of material.




Your Assignment
:
Share how you can promote and/or model digital citizenship and responsibility for ethical use of digital information including respect for copyright, intellectual property and the appropriate documentation of sources.
You don't have to go to the extremes that eLearning coach, Julie Randolph took on Halloween.  She arrived at Lincoln School clad as a pirate to reinforce her lesson on copyright laws.  She shared this site created by eighth graders in Kansas http://www.wix.com/mrssmoke/le-arrgh-teen-anti-piracy

Other resources worthy of your time:
Sue Waters of Edublogs shared this
Teaching Students about Creative Commons and Appropriate Use of Images

I highly recommend checking out this wiki: Teaching about Creative Commons
 
Richard Byrne’s blog “Free Technology for Teachers” offers this post Six Resources for Learning about Fair Use











40 comments:

  1. Copyright law is something that has fallen by the wayside in the US, unless you're a lawyer, librarian, or other creative professional. And I don't mean to make it sound like a light issue with that opening statement.
    The web makes it so easy to find anything we want [for free] and it is hard to remember that I didn't take that photograph or make the infographic I shared on my blog. I don't encourage kids to include pictures unless they take it themselves or pull from a creative commons source.
    Another good site for creative commons images is www.compfight.com, and you can do many of the same things that search.creativecommons.org can do. Its a simpler interface, and I think that's why the kids like it.

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  2. This is very helpful to me as I am trying to teach elementary kids how to use computers and how to site their sources for presentations they are making. It is very good to remember for any grade level. I think the creative commons site is good, especially for photos, that is where I would probably use it most to find examples to show my students.

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  3. Thanks for sharing the compfight.com resource--it's a much slicker looking platform and the results were great. I also appreciate your honest response to the issue, which is why our opening the discussion is so critical.

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  4. I spent most of September with my 3rd - 6th graders talking about digital citizenship. One of my lessons focused on internet research - howe to find information/content and citing sources when appropriate. I tried to explain and model instances where images were for public use and when images were copyrighted or had a name attached to them. It is so easy to just ignore this issue. I've tried to stress to my students that not only do you have to be careful what text you copy and paste but also what images/sounds/videos that you use as well. This site would be a good way to introduce and model this concept.

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  5. I am not really feeling this site so far. I am still trying to understand the jargon and how the various types of licenses can be mixed and matched on the site. Also, I feel guilty because the home page is all about making a donation to the campaign and I would feel obligated to donate because I am using their resources! Finally, my searches (searches relevant to my work) didn't yield any results when I marked the first license box. So I am going to sit this one out, as far as using it as a webtool, although I agree that digital citizenship is extremely important and should always be top of mind, especially as new generations of technically advanced users are born/made! I will go back to the site again and see if I change my tune. If not, I will stick with using Flickr/Google Images/etc. directly...

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  6. Dr. Blue brings up a good point. If you already have a tool that works for you then there is no reason to change. Both Flickr and Google Images have advanced searches that allow you to search only works with permission to reuse.

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  7. We spent a whole unit in college on digital citizenship, what teachers are allowed to use, how to cite, etc. While I understand what I am allowed to do, my students did not. The first project I assigned required students to pick a career that involved chemistry. They were to write ONE paragraph about that job. Even writing 5 sentences was too much for some students who blatantly plagiarized from the Internet. This led to a stern talk from me about what it meant to have digital citizenship. After our talk, I haven't had any more problems.

    I think it is just so easy for our students to go to a website like Wikipedia and copy and paste. I know my class wasn't the first that students plagiarized, and I probably wasn't the first teacher to catch them, but more need to keep an eye out rather than just give the student credit for doing their homework.

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  8. I think that to model what the appropriate action is for our students makes more of an impact than just discussing how to cite. When I use a flipchart, image, video or quote that is not my own, by documenting the source, I am teaching my students the correct way. Copy and Paste is so quick and easy...sometimes too easy. It is nice to have a search engine to provide students like this one.

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  9. Great resource. I have students find cc licensed music to edit in Audacity or Aviary. This looks like a great place to have them search. They do multimedia projects using images, videos, and music. Rather than sending them all over to look for different sources, it will be nice to have one place to look for everything they need.

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  10. I need a "Like" button for that comment Mrs. Esparza!

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  11. This is a great thread. It is so timely, current and so necessary in today's digital world.

    Our students have a hard time understanding the concept of copyright. That is to be expected, though, as many professionals have difficulty parsing out the finer points. Too often our students have pulled something that is protected, but they have no idea what they did was wrong, in the least, or criminal, at the worst.

    It is funny that this thread came up today as I just received an email that alerted me to wired.com's donation to the cc world. They have started with a small collection of 50 images that they have run; but I expect that they will soon be expanding that offering.

    My yearbook staff for years has wanted to do a current events section. We can buy one from the printing company, but we have always wanted to do it ourselves to match the style of the rest of the book. What has kept us from that has been the cost associated with joining a press outlet to get those images. CC will solve that problem for us and give us access to images that we have been dreaming about.

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  12. Not something I would use in my classes, but it is good to know about it.

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  13. I am guilty of using the fast and easy method of copying and pasting. This thread has really made me think about how I am not modeling proper digital citizenship for my students. I need to be more conscientious about how I present my material. I’m not sure about the ease of use of this site though.

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  14. Thanks Mr. Wells for adding to the discussion. For anyone else who is interested in wired.com's decision here's a link sharing the story http://planet.creativecommons.org/

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  15. I think that our students have the opinion that if something is on the web it is free..and so do many adults. This is a great tool for teaching proper digital citizenship to adults too.

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  16. What a great debate we have going here! :) I am way more comfortable using the norm, but maybe that's not such a good thing. I have decided I do need to practice more with this tool. So that I can be well experienced to use it with the kiddos if that is the route I decide to go.

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  17. I agree with everyone about copyright law being tossed aside in the past few years. It is too easy to copy and past. As for this site, it isn't very user friendly. I have been using google and have gotten quick and familiar with the format...

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  18. Mr. Shockley you got me thinking...I wonder if anyone would want to put their new knowledge of Jing to work and make a screencast of how they use the advanced search features in Google Images?

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  19. Copyright laws are everywhere. Before starting a project (even in math) I have to remind students what it means to plagiarize and that it does not make it right to copy anything someone else did without giving them credit for the work. I have also learned that students need to know, copying an entire project and giving the author credit, does not mean that they get a grade! Someone else did all the work, so someone else gets the grade!

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  20. I actually heard of Creative Commons through one of my grad classes. One of my assignments was to create a copyright training presentation that could be shared with the age group you chose. I was able to find some good information through Creative Commons. I like that they have resources available to help you with better understanding what copyright is and how to use it correctly.

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  21. I think this is a great tool to add to your search engine repertoire. It would be a great lesson to have students search for an image on Creative Commons and Google Images to compare the number of results that show up. It would show them the amount of images that are available for reuse versus the ones that are copyright protected. Copyright laws are often overlooked by students, especially with how easy it is to copy and paste. By bringing it to their attention, I think it will make the problem more real to them. That being said, it will take a lot of time and effort to get students to use a new search engine.

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  22. This particular website does not pertain to my work with children on a regular basis, as I primarily work with reading groups. With that being said, however, it is a very worthwhile tool for helping kids do research in the classroom, and with my own children at home. I've never really thought about copying and pasting images in the presentations I've created in the past. This is a site I'd be willing to do again, and I would be happy to share it with my students.

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  23. It is so easy and convinient for students and adults to just copy something and paste into their own project. Many do not understand just how easy it is to plagaraize or the extensive list of things that need citing. This search tool would be a great way to reinforce researching and teaching how to properly give credit for various materials.

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  24. Hey, I checked back tonight and noticed the request for a short tutorial on searching for Creative Commons licensed images. Well, ask and you shall receive! The link to using Google Image search as well as the Compfight search is pasted below:

    http://www.screencast.com/t/BCK6xrJb

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  25. Digital communication has made it so easy to forget about or ignore copyright issues. This blog has raised my awareness of how copyright and proper citing of sources applies to the internet.

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  26. Opened my eyes on copyright for pictures and graphics used in presentations. I never had really thought about citing them.

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  27. I learned this skill when I started giving presentations in high school. The first time I didn't cite my sources or give credit where it was due, I lost major points. That taught me to always give credit. I've noticed more recently that websites, such as Weebly, are giving credit to the owners of the photos used on their site. I've even clicked on the link it gives at the bottom to see if the person has any other photos or interesting tid bits that could be helpful to me. I think this tool would be great to give a lesson with on the first day of school, especially to freshmen, to help them understand that taking things from the internet without giving credit is like copying word for word from a book.

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  28. I am working on research currently with my 4th graders. Taking my Masters is all about citation, citation, citation. Trying to teach them about this. I will for sure take a look into. Thanks for sharing.

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  29. Brian, Thanks for the Screencast!

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  30. I really struggle with this myself. Up until my most recent blog, the ease with which I could pull down an image from a google search to highlight my theme, outweighed the potential copyright violation that might come from taking the time to search for a properly licensed image.

    I've since taken the high road in an effort to model good citizenship. This has not come without some pain. Spending the extra time to find a great image that is free to use, or that has available attribution information, or that hasn't been improperly shared so many times that finding the original source is frustrating, has often left me wondering why I bother.

    This tool is a huge help with that. I also agree that there are other great sources and search tools for this process.

    My favorite and fastest solution to this problem, though, is to take the pictures that I need myself. It's forced me to think more about design, photography, and the power of the image. It has also led me to take a little more pride in the posts to which my images are attached.

    This is also a great model for students. The first step is to learn what a great image is. The second is to learn to honor the creativity of others by using their work respectfully. The third is to learn to create these images ourselves and to contribute to the world's information.

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  31. Thanks for the video, Brian. I have always had students give the url for the images and information that they have used in their projects, but after viewing a few of the sites and tutorials, they should be more aware how to search for Creative Commons licensed images.

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  32. I have to express that I understand what Tim is saying. I have always taken issue with illegal, free music and movies taken from the web but I never really thought much about images. I am sad to say that I have taken a number of images from a Google image search without ever checking the rights for that image. Some of that came from my ignorance (or lack of wanting to know) and some of that came from not knowing a good resource to help me. Having and using resources like this is definitely helpful. I like the comment earlier about being a good model in front of our students. If we as the adults and professionals will be diligent about this in front of students, I believe that message will be clear. Of course some reminders and lessons along the way will help too!

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  33. Great resource, it is something that as adults we do not always model appropriately for our students.

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  34. The posts for this challenge have been very informative and have forced me to think about the source of photos and images my students use in their projects. We recently put together a presentation and students were asked to add visuals to their Prezi or Powerpoint. We did not discuss the ethics of searching for these materials.
    Creative Commons gives me a starting point for the conversations needed regarding permissions for pics, images, and music.
    Students never question if they have permission to use materials from the Internet, and quite honestly I have never thought about discussing it with them.

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  35. I have never thought much about the copyrights when searching on the internet. I am glad to know that there is a way to search.

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  36. "The thing about quotations on the internet, is you can never be sure of their validity." -- Abraham Lincoln

    This is so true. We take information on the internet for granted, assuming what we read is true because well, it's on the internet! I do like this site for use of a research paper. I'm not really sure I could use it in grades K-3, but if I end up teaching middle school again, I would definitely use this to teach digital citizenship. This would be a requirement when doing research papers.

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  37. This is a wonderful tool to use when creating videos, or presentations of any kind. Many students do not realize that it's not ok to use just any song or picture. So you could teach them, and show them how to navigate this website for their needs.

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  38. This will make citing sources a bit easier. I have tried teaching students how to cite sources and images for presentations. The students seem to be overwhelmed. This would help the students to focus more on citing information rather than multimedia sources.

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  39. I love this! It took a bit for me to understand what was going on with the redirects, but after I got the hang of it I can see the usefulness. Anytime we use internet searches, this would be a great site to have the students go through if they are going to be reusing someone else's creations. I remember plagiarism and copyrights being a big deal when I was going through grade school and it stuck with me for text, but I never really connected it to images, so I haven't thought about passing that on to the students. I think this will make students see this importance and hopefully create a more digitally responsible generation. I would have my students compile a group of items they would need to list license information on as an introduction lesson before expecting them to use the site in connection with independent research.

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  40. I agree that proper digital citizenship is very important to model to our students. This is a great tool to use for our students, and it is also something I can pass on to my University students!

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